Must See Guinness Storehouse

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The Guinness Storehouse is only 8 minutes by car from City Centre. Tevis and I both looked forward to visiting St James Gate Brewery. It opened at 9:30 a.m. on Sunday.

A pint of dark stout with a creamy head of foam is part of the Irish experience and when you are in Dublin, it is fun to learn more about what makes a Guinness great. I visited the Guinness Storehouse previously but it has been more than 10 years and the entire experience has been redesigned. They have state of the art exhibits that both entertain and educate. Plus there is tasting. You don’t have to be 21 (or 18–Ireland’s drinking age) to visit as they pour soft drinks as well as Guinness products.

When you first enter the Storehouse, after buying your ticket, people gather around a copy of the 9000 year lease for the property at St James Gate visible in the floor. As you look up you can see the glass and structure of the 7 story building that houses the exhibits and tasting rooms. It echoes the shape of a pint glass.

You can save money by buying in advance and there are discounts with some of the “Hop On” bus tours. The Storehouse is open 7 days a week from 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. except major holidays. Going early in the day is a great way to avoid the tour buses and crowds. There are restaurants and coffee shops if you want to incorporate this in your plans. Leave time to browse in the gift shop.

My favorite section has always been their advertising, which has been top drawer for over a hundred years. I found myself crying over the Irish rugby ad.

We decided to imbibe at the Gravity Lounge on the top floor. The view of Dublin is incredible. I decided to try a half pint of the new to me Hop House 13. This lager is only available in Ireland, UK and Canada. I really like it–it’s crisp and clean tasting. When you order a half pint they tear your ticket in half and you can try something else with another half pint. It was 11:00 a.m. on a Sunday so I stuck to my half pint.

I really enjoyed the silly sculpture of the fish riding the bicycle. A few people will be getting this image in their stocking this Christmas.

 

 

Irish Lit

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“The hardest part of finding the perfect gift for a friend is parting with it.” JA Pieper

We love the Irish because they don’t take themselves too seriously. Even their genius writers got pissed on a regular basis at pubs round Dublin (according to the Literary Publ Crawl guides). Yet their small island can boast 4 Nobel prizes for literature: WB Yeats in 1911, George Bernard Shaw in 1936, Samuel Beckett in 1977, and Seamus Heaney in 1995. Seems they are due for one.

Alas the Nobel committee didn’t have the opportunity to debate whether to honor the by-then disgraced Oscar Wilde. The prize started in 1901 and he died in 1900. Oscar Wilde towers off to the side where he can critique and sometimes ridicule the pompous and the fool.

I found this gem of book of Oscar Wilde quotes at the Dublin Writers Museum bookshop. (I admit I only went there for the bookstore because they haven’t changed up the exhibits since the 90s, and they still don’t have a website!)

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James Joyce is celebrated by some as the greatest Irish writer but I’ve never been able to finish anything of his. I discovered An Evil Cradling by Brian Keenan on the literary pub crawl back in the 90s and it is still one of my all time favorite books.

This morning I am reading it before I mail it to a friend and I am inspired, amused, and left with quite a bit to think over. Here are a few of the highlights:

Selfishness is not living as one wishes to live, it is asking others to live as one wishes to live. -O.W.

Bad art is a good deal worse than no art at all. -O.W.

Prayer must never be answered: if it is, it ceases to be prayer and becomes correspondence. -O.W.

Society sooner or later must return to its lost leader, the cultured and fascinating liar. -O.W.

Anyone can make history. Ony a great man can write it. -O.W.

Anybody can sympathize with the sufferings of a friend, but it requires a very fine nature–it requires, in fact, that nature of a true Individualist–to sympathize with a friend’s success. -O.W.

 

 

 

 

Perfect Days

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View of Auckland from the ferry to Devonport

What does the perfect day look like to you? Of course it depends on where you are. In New York City it might start with coffee and a bagel, include a visit to the zoo in Central Park and end with a Broadway play and a nightcap. I remember one day in Belfast it included taking the bus into the central business district and fossicking around the shops, enjoying a coffee, then listening to Brian Keenan read from his latest novel at the literary festival.

Today is a perfect day at home. I am free of engagements and I can do what I like. I’ve walked to the bakery and farmers’ market. Then I went through my stack of travel magazines. I am watching Poldark (season 1) and Netflix. It is a pretty day and mild weather for July. It is a good day for a bike ride or a hike. My perfect today is full of rest instead and may include a nap.  Once the kids, my brother and I were in Dublin and our perfect day included a long afternoon of drinking coffee and enjoying our own company. Then we found the perfect stew for dinner.

Auckland is someplace I have spent many of perfect day. It often includes a visit to the Auckland Museum. I just received the Spring newsletter (remember, seasons are opposite the Northern hemisphere) and there is an interesting new exhibit opening in October called “Sound.” It spotlights the history of pop music in New Zealand. I will check it out when I visit in November. Days in Auckland also include shopping in Trelise Cooper and Unity Books or taking the ferry and mooching around Devonport.

Jump into Ireland, Jump into Belfast

I am missing Belfast, Northern Ireland. You are only surprised by that statement if you have never been. I have been lucky enough to spend considerable time in Belfast both on vacation and on Habitat for Humanity Global Village builds for two weeks at a time.

New Titanic Museum in Belfast
New Titanic Museum in Belfast

For a period of about 10 years I flew to Ireland about every 18 months. Every experience was special.  The first trip was a 4 days in Dublin. Epic. Then I won a trip to Ireland at the Sacramento Irish American Club’s St. Patrick’s Day party. My friend Cameon and I drove around the island with a quick trip through Nor Ireland. We laughed our way through learning to shift the car and drive on the other side. We had such fun.

Shortly after that I was invited to join a Habitat build with Northern Ireland Habitat for Humanity. It was a life changing experience. It was 2000 and the Troubles were technically ended by the peace process, but the evidence of strife was still easy to find. That was part of the attraction–amazing, wonderful people amidst political conflict. Oh, and did I mention that Northern Ireland is beautiful. On that same trip I climbed the Giant’s Causeway and hiked to the Belfast Caves.

I had the opportunity to hear Van Morrison live in his home town, and Brian Keenan to read from his latest book at a literary festival. The disturbing political murals are a reminder that peace is a process, not a single vote. Every visit provides signs of progress.  I am in love with Derry (slash Londonderry) and spent a wild day in a thunder shower (technically in Donegal) after passing soldiers with automatic rifles patrolling the border. I walked in a St Patrick’s Day parade in Downpatrick where the great saint is buried.

I made several subsequent trips to build homes or to visit friends. In a recent issue of Afar magazine I spied an ad for Ireland that featured the new Titanic Belfast museum. The Titanic was built in Belfast shipyards. It does not hold any fascination for me, and yet I will go one day.

Maybe one day soon. I am keen to see friends and ride my bike up to the Habitat work site.  I am looking into a flying visit before I report to Yorkshire for the first stage of Tour de France 2014.